When matters regarding child custody are resolved through a final divorce decree, these terms must be followed by a child’s parents, and noncompliance can result in serious legal penalties. However, because life changes and these changes can impact custody issues, it is possible for parents to pursue modifications of child custody after a final divorce decree to try to get the terms of custody altered by the court to meet the new situation and circumstances of the parents and/or children.

In this three-part blog series, we will highlight some important facts to know about modifications of child custody in Colorado. Although the information presented herein is general, you can easily get more specific info and professional advice regarding your situation by contacting an experienced Centennial child custody lawyer at the Law Office of Bruce H. Rabun, LLC. Our attorneys have the skills, dedication and experience necessary to successfully resolve any custody or family law issue.

Here’s What You Should Know about Modifications of Child Custody…

Fact 1 – If parents can agree on modifications of child custody, the courts may not need to get involved.

Modifications of child custody can be as contentious as custody issues that arise during divorce cases. Here’s some important info to know about modifications of child custody.

Modifications of child custody can be as contentious as custody issues that arise during divorce cases. Here’s some important info to know about modifications of child custody.

This is the most ideal situation when it comes to pursuing modifications of child custody agreements. When the circumstances of one or both parents (and/or the involved child) changes and the parents can agree on how the custody arrangement needs to be altered, then the courts will support this modification, and documentation regarding it should be submitted to the courts so that they can now enforce the new agreement.

For instance, if a mother has primary custody and a father’s work schedule changes, he may need to change the days on which he spends time with his child. If the mother agrees to this change, then documentation regarding the change simply needs to be filed with the court (likely with a nominal administrative fee) for these modifications to be made.

If, however, parents cannot come to an agreement, which is not uncommon, then the courts will get involved.

Fact 2 – When parents cannot agree on modifications of child custody, they may be sent to mediation, or the court may resolve the issue.

When matters regarding modifications of child custody are brought to the courts for a resolution, a judge may send a couple to mediation to try to work out an agreement outside of court, or (s)he may immediately oversee a resolution in the case.

When mediation doesn’t work or judges choose to handle the case, both parents (ideally represented by attorneys) will go to court to present their arguments and evidence regarding why or why not certain changes should be made to the current custody arrangement. After hearing all of the arguments and taking in all of the evidence of the case, the judge will issue a ruling.

If the ruling is in favor of a modification, the judge will also typically state when the modification will go into effect (and this can be immediately, if or when necessary).

We will continue discussing some important facts to know about modifications of child custody in the second and third parts of this blog series that will be posted soon – don’t miss them!

Centennial Child Custody Lawyer at the Law Office of Bruce H. Rabun, LLC

When you are you considering moving forward with a modification to your custody agreement, you can trust Centennial Child Custody Attorney Bruce H. Rabun to provide you with caring, aggressive representation and the highest quality legal services.

To learn more about how Bruce H. Rabun can help you, schedule an initial consultation with him today by calling (303) 221-7899 or by emailing our firm using the contact form on this page. From our office in Centennial, we represent people throughout the Denver metro areas, Arapahoe County, Douglas County and Jefferson County.

Categories: Blog, Child Custody, Family Law