Choosing to move forward with a divorce is not an easy decision to make, but it may be the best one for you and your future. Whether you are still grappling with this difficult decision or you are ready to move forward with your Colorado divorce case, you likely have some questions about what to expect moving forward.

In this three-part blog series, we will respond to some commonly asked questions about Colorado divorce cases to try to clarify the process and assuage some of people’s anxieties about it. If you are ready to get some answers about Colorado divorce that pertain specifically to your situation, Centennial Divorce Attorney Bruce H. Rabun is ready to meet with you. Contact us today to schedule a meeting and to learn more about your best options for proceeding with your Colorado divorce case.

Here’s What You May Want to Know about Colorado Divorce…

Q – I’m thinking about filing for divorce. What should I know about Colorado divorce laws?

Do you have questions about Colorado divorce cases? If so, we have the answers you are looking for. Read these FAQs. Or contact us today to get more answers.

Do you have questions about Colorado divorce cases? If so, we have the answers you are looking for. Read these FAQs. Or contact us today to get more answers.

A – First and foremost, when you are ready to move forward with a Colorado divorce (and you’ve never gone through one before), you may want to be aware of the fact that Colorado is a “no fault” divorce state. What this means for you is that:

  • Any alleged misconduct in the marriage (aside, of course, from domestic violence) will not be a factor that will be considered as part of the process of resolving the case.
  • Instead, if it’s left up to the courts to resolve the divorce (because soon-to-be-exes can’t agree on all of the issues of the case), the courts will do their best to determine what is “equitable” (or fair) in order to resolve Colorado divorce cases.

Q – Is there a way to fast-track my Colorado divorce if there are no children involved in the case?

A – Yes, particularly if you and your ex-partner are able to agree on the various issues of the divorce case. Specifically, if you and your ex-partner do not have children and you both agree on how the marital assets and debts are to be divided among the two of you, then these cases can be fast-tracked – and the courts will usually uphold the agreement that you and your ex-partner have officially made (as long, of course, as it’s sensible and generally equitable).

It’s important to point out here, however, that:

  • Talking to a soon-to-be-ex about how to divide marital property and debts can seem amicable in the initial stages of a Colorado divorce case.
  • It’s not uncommon for the verbal agreements between divorcing parties to become disputed or to be thrown out the window when it comes to time to make things official.

As a result, it’s best to retain an experienced divorce attorney – like the Centennial divorce lawyers at the Law Office of Bruce H. Rabun, LLC – to ensure that your interests will always be protected, especially if or when uncontested divorce cases become contested Colorado divorce cases.

We will answer some more questions about Colorado divorce cases in the second and third parts of this blog series that will be published soon. Be sure to look for them… or simply call us for answers to all of your questions about Colorado divorce.

Centennial Divorce Lawyer at the Law Office of Bruce H. Rabun, LLC

When you are you considering divorce, you can trust Centennial Divorce Attorney Bruce H. Rabun to provide you with caring, aggressive representation and the highest quality legal services.

We welcome you to attend an initial consultation with Centennial Divorce Attorney Bruce H. Rabun to get professional advice and find out more about how he can help you.

You can schedule this meeting by calling (303) 221-7899 or by emailing our firm using the contact form on this page. From our office in Centennial, we represent people throughout the Denver metro areas, Arapahoe County, Douglas County and Jefferson County.

Categories: Blog, Divorce, Family Law