Colorado is among a handful of states that honors common law marriages. Given that there is a lot of ambiguity surrounding what constitutes a Colorado common law marriage and what happens when people want to end these marriages, in this blog series, we will answer some commonly asked questions about Colorado common law marriage and divorce.

While the answers provided herein are generally helpful, you can get more personalized answers and experienced help with any type of divorce – or family law issue – by contacting trusted Denver Divorce Attorney Bruce H. Rabun. He is dedicated to providing people with the best divorce representation, and he has the experience you can count on to favorably resolve your divorce.

Answers about Colorado Common Law Marriage and Divorce

Q – What constitutes a Colorado common law marriage?

Do you need answers about Colorado common law marriage? If so, check out these FAQs. Or contact us today for help resolving your family law matters.

Do you need answers about Colorado common law marriage? If so, check out these FAQs. Or contact us today for help resolving your family law matters.

A – According to Colorado law, a given relationship constitutes a Colorado common law marriage when individuals in the relationship:

  • Hold themselves out as husband and wife
  • Consent to the relationship
  • Live together
  • Are known in the community as being married
  • Are not legally prohibited from being in the relationship (because, for instance, they are already married to someone else).

Here, it’s crucial to note that:

  • Relationships can evolve into a Colorado common law marriage.
  • When couples hold themselves out as husband and wife even in seemingly unimportant ways (like on greeting cards), this can support the fact that a Colorado common law marriage exists.
  • Knowing whether you are in a Colorado common law marriage is important, as this relationship can impact you various ways (even if you don’t ever separate from your partner).

Q – Does a relationship have to have lasted a certain period of time in order to be considered a Colorado common law marriage?

A – No, there are no time limits regarding Colorado common law marriage, so a relationship lasting a few months can be just as valid of a Colorado common law marriage as one that last 10 or more years, as long as the above-listed requirements have been satisfied.

For some more answers about Colorado common law marriage and divorce, don’t miss the second and third parts of this blog series. They’ll be posted soon.

Denver Divorce Lawyer at the Law Office of Bruce H. Rabun, LLC

Are you ready to file for divorce? If so, you can trust Denver Divorce Attorney Bruce H. Rabun to provide you with caring, aggressive representation and the highest quality legal services.

For more than three decades, Attorney Bruce H. Rabun has been committed to providing each of his clients with personal representation to effectively guide them through life’s changes. While our Denver divorce lawyer will always clearly explain your options and be responsive to your concerns regarding divorce, he will also apply his extensive knowledge of Colorado law, as well as his vast legal experience, to your case to help you develop innovative solutions for your sensitive and important family law matters.

To find out more about how Denver Divorce Attorney Bruce H. Rabun can help you, contact us today to set up an initial consultation. You can schedule this meeting by calling (303) 221-7899 or by emailing our firm using the contact form on this page. From our office in Centennial, we represent people throughout the Denver metro areas, Arapahoe County, Douglas County and Jefferson County.

Categories: Blog, Common Law Divorce, Divorce, Family Law