When issues regarding custody and parenting time come up, one of the more important matters that may also arise and will be critical to determine is the allocation of parental decision-making authority between a child’s parents. In other words, how much decision-making authority will each parent have when making decisions about a child’s health, his education and his religion.

When issues regarding parental decision-making authority over children arise, you can trust Centennial Attorney Bruce H. Rabun to resolve these issues as favorably as possible.

When issues regarding parental decision-making authority over children arise, you can trust Centennial Attorney Bruce H. Rabun to resolve these issues as favorably as possible.

Although it make be possible for some parents to agree upon the division of parental decision-making authority over a child, it’s not uncommon for this topic to be a source of contention, particularly when custody cases are already heated disputes.

Regardless of how amicable a custody case may be, having Centennial Child Custody Attorney Bruce H. Rabun on your side to advocate your interests will be critical to getting the best possible outcomes to these matters.

Determining Parental Decision-Making Authority

When allocating parental decision-making authority, Colorado courts typically prefer that both of a child’s parents share this responsibility. The degree to which this authority is shared, however, and who may have authority over what types of decisions will be determined by the courts based on a number of different factors, only some of which include:

  • The custody arrangement and how much parenting time has been allotted to each parent
  • Whether one parent may have mental health issues and/or addiction issues
  • Whether either parent has a history of making poor decisions (which may be evidenced by, for instance, a criminal conviction).

Modifications of Decision-Making Authority

Once the court has ruled on the division of parental decision-making authority over a child, parents should be aware that they can petition the court to modify this arrangement in the future when there may be a need to. Unlike with other modifications cases (like, for instance, cases related to modifications of child support or modifications of parenting time), these modifications for decision-making authority are NOT primarily based on the “best interests” standard.

Instead, Colorado law (C.R.S. § 14-10-124) outlines some very specific requirements that have to be met in order for modifications of parental decision-making authority to be considered and granted by the court. Specifically, the possible grounds for these modifications include:

  • Both parents agreeing that the modification for decision-making authority should occur.
  • A child integrating into one parent’s family with the other parent’s consent.
  • There has been some significant modification to the distribution of parenting time.
  • One parent has been consistently making important decisions for the child with the other parent’s consent.
  • A modification is crucial to protecting a child’s health, safety and/or wellbeing.

Centennial Child Custody Lawyer at the Law Office of Bruce H. Rabun, LLC

Are trying to work out parental decision-making authority in a custody case? Or do you need help modifying a court’s decision about this authority? If so, you can trust Centennial Child Custody Attorney Bruce H. Rabun to provide you with caring, aggressive representation and the highest quality legal services.

When you trust your case to Centennial Child Custody Lawyer Bruce H. Rabun, you can be confident that he will work relentlessly to fight for your rights and help you successfully resolve your family law issues while preserving what is most important to you.

Let’s Meet to Discuss Your Case – Contact Us

Let’s talk about your issues regarding decision-making authority for your child(ren). To set up an initial consultation and get professional advice regarding how to proceed, call us (303) 221-7899 or email our firm using the contact form on this page.

From our office in Centennial, we represent people throughout the Denver metro areas, Arapahoe County, Douglas County and Jefferson County.